Re-Assessing Stolon Growth with Attention to Galling in Hawkweeds

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BY KEITH MORGAN

My previous visualizations had given me a few assumptions about the trial that seemed to go against some of the hypotheses of the researchers. I had come across a trend that seemed to show that when introduced to the biocontrols at certain ages, the hawkweeds tended to grow more stolons rather than fewer. What I had not taken into account when exploring this was what the galls themselves were doing: how were the galls dispersed on the plants, and did this have an effect? Again, I severely averaged out the data, this time combining all of the trials and all of the ages for the test group as one entity, and the control group as another. The key metrics for this visualization were the total average number of main and lateral stolons that grew on one plant, the average number of main and lateral stolons that had galls, and finally the average total number of galls per plant. Assuming that a galled stolon is considered ‘dysfunctional’, these new numbers actually reversed my original assumption that while galled plants tended to have more stolons on average, they actually had fewer ‘functional’ stolons. In my visualization, only these functional stolons grow to full length.

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